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Carmenta Latin Course Overview

declan reading latin
Declan, 12, Carmenta Latin Junior Student, attends class from the comfort of his home.

Our fully-live, accredited Latin Course has the feel and effectiveness of the best in-person high school or university Latin courses, following a regular three-sessions-a-week, 54-classes-per-semester schedule. With live, crystal-clear Skype audio and video, teacher and students are able to hear and see each other in real time and so communicate just as they would in an in-person class. The Carmenta Latin Course is open to students ages 13 and up, with individual classes taught by the world's best Latin teachers in a digital classroom environment that allows for the immediate back-and-forth essential to long-term language learning. Our Latin Course is exceptionally effective, with students not only scoring extremely well on the National Latin Exam but also (even more impressive) learning Latin with genuine fluency in only 4-6 years!

Latin Course Syllabus

Our group Latin classes follow a comprehensive, logical curriculum.

The following is a detailed syllabus of our Latin Course, broken down by individual class level. Mid-course transfers are not allowed—all new students enrolling in the Carmenta Latin Course have to begin in the first semester of the course, Latin 1A.

"A"-Level Classes (Latin 1A, Latin 2A, Latin 3A, and Latin 4A) are offered only in the Fall and "B"-Level Classes (Latin 1B, Latin 2B, Latin 3B, and Latin 4B) only in the Spring. If you have any questions at all, please Contact us.

Click here to Sign Up for the Carmenta Latin Course.

Latin 1A (LAT 101)

Chapters 1-10 of Wheelock includes:

  • Chapter 1. Verbs; First and Second Conjugations: Present Infinitive, Indicative, and Imperative Active; Translating
  • Chapter 2. Nouns and Cases; First Declension; Agreement of Adjectives; Syntax
  • Chapter 3. Second Declension: Masculine Nouns and Adjectives; Apposition; Word
  • Chapter 4. Second Declension Neuters; Adjectives; Present Indicative of Sum; Predicate Nouns and Adjectives; Substantive Adjectives
  • Chapter 5. First and Second Conjugations: Future and Imperfect; Adjectives in -er
  • Chapter 6. Sum: Future and Imperfect Indicative; Possum: Present, Future, and Imperfect Indicative; Complementary Infinitive
  • Chapter 7. Third Declension Nouns
  • Chapter 8. Third Conjugation: Present Infinitive, Present, Future, and Imperfect Indicative, Imperative
  • Chapter 9. Demonstratives Hic, Ille, Iste; Special -ius Adjectives
  • Chapter 10. Fourth Conjugation and -io Verbs of the Third

Latin 1B (LAT 102)

Chapters 11-20 of Wheelock includes:

  • Chapter 11. Personal Pronouns Ego, Tu, and Is; Demonstratives Is and Idem
  • Chapter 12. Perfect Active System of All Verbs
  • Chapter 13. Reflexive Pronouns and Possessives; Intensive Pronoun
  • Chapter 14. I-Stem Nouns of the Third Declension; Ablatives of Means, Accompaniment, and Manner
  • Chapter 15. Numerals; Genitive of the Whole; Genitive and Ablative with Cardinal Numerals; Ablative of Time
  • Chapter 16. Third Declension Adjectives
  • Chapter 17. The Relative Pronoun
  • Chapter 18. First and Second Conjugations: Passive Voice of the Present System; Ablative of Agent
  • Chapter 19. Perfect Passive System of All Verbs; Interrogative Pronouns and Adjectives
  • Chapter 20. Fourth Declension; Ablatives of Place from Which and Separation

Latin 2A (LAT 201)

Chapters 21-27 of Wheelock includes:

  • Chapter 21. Third and Fourth Conjugations: Passive Voice of the Present System
  • Chapter 22. Fifth Declension; Ablative of Place Where; Summary of Ablative Uses
  • Chapter 23. Participles
  • Chapter 24. Ablative Absolute; Passive Periphrastic; Dative of Agent
  • Chapter 25. Infinitives; Indirect Statement
  • Chapter 26. Comparison of Adjectives; Declension of Comparatives; Ablative of Comparison
  • Chapter 27. Special and Irregular Comparison of Adjectives
  • One additional weekly Latin Conversation class.

Latin 2B (LAT 202)

Chapters 28-34 of Wheelock includes:

  • Chapter 28. Subjunctive Mood; Present Subjunctive; Jussive and Purpose Clauses
  • Chapter 29. Imperfect Subjunctive; Present and Imperfect; Subjunctive of Sum and Possum; Result Clauses
  • Chapter 30. Perfect and Pluperfect Subjunctive; Indirect Questions; Sequence of Tenses
  • Chapter 31. Cum Clauses; Fero
  • Chapter 32. Formation and Comparison of Adverbs; Volo, Malo, Nolo; Proviso Clauses
  • Chapter 33. Conditions
  • Chapter 34. Deponent Verbs; Ablative with Special Deponents
  • One additional weekly Latin Conversation class.

Latin 3A (LAT 301)

Chapters 35-40 of Wheelock includes:

  • Chapter 35. Dative with Adjectives; Dative with Special Verbs; Dative with Compounds
  • Chapter 36. Jussive Noun Clauses; Fio
  • Chapter 37. Conjugation of Eo; Constructions of Place and Time
  • Chapter 38. Relative Clauses of Characteristic; Dative of Reference; Supines
  • Chapter 39. Gerund and Gerundive
  • Chapter 40. -Ne, Num, and Nonne in Direct Questions; Fear Clauses; Genitive and Ablative of Description
  • One weekly Latin Conversation class.

Latin 3B, Upper Division (LAT 302)

Includes: See General Course Outline section below for a summary of Upper Division curriculum.
*One additional weekly Latin Conversation class.

(Note: Individual Latin 3B-4B sessions are only held if there is a total enrollment of 5 or more students.)

Latin 4A, Upper Division (LAT 401)

Includes: See General Course Outline section below for a summary of Upper Division curriculum.
*One weekly Latin Conversation class.

(Note: Individual Latin 3B-4B sessions are only held if there is a total enrollment of 5 or more students.)

Latin 4B, Upper Division (LAT 402)

Includes: See General Course Outline section below for a summary of Upper Division curriculum.
*One weekly Latin Conversation class.

(Note: Individual Latin 3B-4B sessions are only held if there is a total enrollment of 5 or more students.)

Course Composition

Students start out with Wheelock then move on to original unadapted texts.

The complete Carmenta Latin Course is divided into two parts. The first part follows the Wheelock’s Latin text and is split into five sections, each a semester long: Latin 1A, Latin 1B, Latin 2A, Latin 2B, and Latin 3A. In the second part of the course (Latin 3B, Latin 4A, and Latin 4B), students read a series of both classical and modern Latin texts by a variety of writers. At this point classes become fully conversation and reading based, and students utilize all that they've learned about the language in Latin 1A to 3A. Carmenta offers all "A" sections of the course (Latin 1A, Latin 2A, Latin 3A, and Latin 4A) every fall semester and all "B" sections of the course (Latin 1B, Latin 2B, Latin 3B, and Latin 4B) every spring semester. Any student who completes the entire course should be more than prepared for advanced college work.

(Note: Individual Latin 3B-4B sessions are only held if there is a total enrollment of 5 or more students.)

General Latin Course Outline

The Carmenta Latin Course combines intensive grammar study with consistent conversation in the language.

Latin 1A-3A: The main focus of the first 2 1/2 years (5 semesters) of the course is the grammar of the Latin language. Students learn the rules of sentence structure and inflection as they acquire a greater understanding of the grammar and idioms of their native tongue.

Latin 2A: At the start of the third semester, Latin conversation is introduced into the course, with one hour of class-time per week devoted to it exclusively. Students' knowledge of spoken Latin improves little by little, until by Latin 4B conversation in the Latin language becomes (along with translation of historical texts) the primary classroom activity.

Carmenta Latin Conversation.

The conversational aspect of Latin is still neglected by most Latin teachers and left out of the curriculum in most schools, this despite the fact that it is an indispensable aid to students in their study of the Latin language. Without the continuous compositional training that comes with speaking and responding to another person’s speech, it is almost impossible for students to learn Latin vocabulary and idiom and to retain it for any length of time.

Students read unadapted Latin texts.

Latin 3B-4B: In the sixth through eighth semesters (Latin 3B-4B) of the course, we leave behind Wheelock’s Latin and switch to a series of Classical and Modern Latin texts by a variety of authors. Wheelock is a solid text, providing students with an extremely clear and well-organized education in Latin forms and grammar, something essential for any student, especially in the beginning; but after two and a half years (5 semesters) of this sort of learning, it's time for the next stage, a more intense acquisition of Latin vocabulary and idiom.

To achieve this, students engage in Latin conversation and the reading of real Latin texts with very little or no use of dictionaries or grammatical references. The student is prompted to learn from context rather than the voluminous commentary and exposition of the typical Latin textbook. Direct engagement with the text compels the student to think in Latin (rather than using the inefficient method of thinking in English and then translating to Latin in his or her head), guiding the student toward a more instinctual and fluent knowledge of the Latin language.

The curriculum for Latin 3B-4B is the following. Students in these three semesters of the course are combined into a single class.

Fall 2017 Semester

Vulgate, Genesis
Eutropius, Breviarium historiae Romanae
Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico Catullus

Spring 2018 Semester

Vulgate, Exodus
Isidore of Seville, Historia de regibus Gothorum, Vandalorum et Suevorum
Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Civili Catullus

Fall 2018 Semester

Vulgate, John
Bede, Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum
Eutropius, Breviarium historiae Romanae
Catullus

(Note: Individual Latin 3B-4B sessions are only held if there is a total enrollment of 5 or more students.)

Click here to Sign Up for the Carmenta Latin Course.

Latin Course Texts

Wheelock and the Wheelock Workbook anchor the Carmenta Latin Course.

The text used in the first 2 1/2 years (five semesters) of the Carmenta Latin Course is the superbly well-written and well-organized Wheelock’s Latin by Frederic M. Wheelock and Richard A. Lafleur. This text, sold at a very reasonable price compared to most textbooks, can be purchased at the following Bookstores.

This text is appropriate for any adult or teenage Latin student, no matter what the student’s particular goals in the language.

The 4 years (eight semesters) of the Carmenta course (Latin 1A - Latin 4B) are equivalent to the 4 years of Latin offered in most high schools or the first 2-3 years (4-6 Semesters) of Latin taken in most university settings. Each semester class is equivalent in class time to a 3-credit course at a university or high school.

The texts used for the final 1 1/2 years (6th through 8th semesters) of the Carmenta course (Latin 3B - Latin 4B) vary, depending on the semester. Be assured that all texts are reasonably priced and can be purchased (or sometimes even found for free) on the Web.

The sixth through eighth (Upper Division) semesters of the Carmenta Latin Course have coursework typical of the third and fourth years of a university Latin course.

Beginning in the first semester we also make use of the Workbook for Wheelock's Latin by Paul T. Comeau and Richard A. Lafleur. The Wheelock Workbook provides extra work for the student in the nuts and bolts of Latin grammar and translation. Students utilize this supplementary text all the way up through Latin 3A. You can purchase the text at these Bookstores.

(Note: Individual Latin 3B-4B sessions are only held if there is a total enrollment of 5 or more students.)

Latin Course Transfers

All students begin the Carmenta Latin Course in Latin 1A and proceed through the classes in order. Students cannot begin in a more advanced semester. We've instituted this policy because the majority of students who've taken Latin before and so have started in a more advanced semester of our course, have not in fact been ready for that level. All Latin courses are not created equal, and it is very important to us that all Carmenta students be given the tools they need to become true masters of the Latin language.

Class Length

The length of classes is adjusted when enrollment is small.

If a Carmenta Latin class has enrollment of fewer than 5 students, then the length of that class is adjusted to suit the particular class size. Classes with 5 or more students are 60 minutes long, those with 3 or 4 students are 45 minutes long, and those with 1 or 2 students are 30 minutes long. We have found that these are appropriate class lengths for classes of these sizes, allowing the teacher plenty of time to cover the semester's material. Obviously, the shorter class time is made up for by the high amount of personal attention each student receives. There is no change in the tuition for these smaller, shortened classes. It remains $750 per semester.

Click here to Sign Up for the Carmenta Latin Course.

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